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Latest entries for tag 'simulation'

World Champion in the RoboCup Logistics League 2014 in Brazil

We did it! We won in the RoboCup Logistics League 2014 in João Pessoa, Brazil. In a flawless run through the tournament we won every game and had an exiting final against the title defender Bavarian Bending Units. We participated with the Carologistics team, a joint venture of the Knowledge-based Systems Group, RWTH Aachen University, the IMA/ZLW & IFU Institute Cluster, RWTH Aachen University, and the Department for Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Robotics Group, FH Aachen

A few days after the German national team won the Fifa World Cup, we also went to Brazil to win a title, in our case the RoboCup 2014 Logistics League. We competed with 9 other teams from Germany, Brazil, Japan, Egypt, Mexico, Switzerland and France. After arriving in João Pessoa, a beautiful city at the beach with topical weather and a lot of coconuts to drink from, we could continue with our good performance from the German Open. Nevertheless we faced various challenges, such as changing lightening conditions and recovering from wrong worldmodels after wrong perception results. As we solved these issues and further improved our low level skills, which use the Lua behavior engine, and the high level task decision based on an incremental reasoning approach in CLIPS with improved multi-robot collaboration, we continued to increase our performance.

In the final we won against the Bavarian Bending Units with the score 165:124. The following video shows the final.

In the first phase, the exploration phase, we could successfully detect all light signals to determine the machine types. Even after one robot had to be restarted, it could continue its work because the robot team synchronizes their knowledge about the world.
In the production phase the robot team got randomized orders and had to produce the products according to the production chain and the machine types with the raw material pucks lying on the side of the field. We especially profited from our collision avoidance and multi-robot coordination. The collision avoidance allowed us to get through narrow passages between other robots or take alternative paths. The high level decision making and multi-robot coordination of the CLIPS agent lead to a fast completion of complex products.

We also won multiple technical challenges, namely the navigation challenge and the MPS challenge:

At the RoboCup Symposium we presented our simulation of the RoboCup Logistics League. It is an important tool for rapid prototyping, especially of the high level decision and multi-robot coordination. It features a 3D physics and sensor simulation with real world environment agency because it is controlled by the referee box that also controls the real game.

Posted by Frederik Zwilling on July 24, 2014 18:00

Winner of the RoboCup German Open 2014 Logistics League

We won the RoboCup German Open 2014 Logistics League with the Carologistics team. In the finals we beat the TUMsBendingUnits with 71:30. This is an important milestone on the road to the RoboCup 2014 in Brazil.

After some mayor rule changes the competing teams had to play in a shared factory space. Here we benefited from your flexible navigation and collision avoidance. The collision avoidance was ported to Fawkes from the AllemaniAcs Team in the RoboCup@Home league and uses an occupancy grid, A* search and a collision free triangle to find trajectories on the planned path. Our performance was also boosted by a closer multi-robot coordination, which allowed the robot team to produce ordered goods more quickly. The robots could perform small sub-steps of a larger production task in parallel and could continue with the work of another robot. For the development of the agent, the component responsible for the task reasoning and multi-robot coordination, we used a Gazebo based simulation of the Logistics League, which allowed rapid prototyping. Furthermore we used more robust techniques for visual perception of light signals and pucks by using colour filters and geometrical clues.

Posted by Frederik Zwilling on April 5, 2014 12:00

MongoDB Logging presented at ROSCon 2013

Last weekend some of us went to ROSCon 2013 to listen to all the great stuff happening in the ROS eco system and present some of our own work.

The item which probably gained most attention was the presentation and announcement of the MoveIt release. It's definitely something to look into and a platform to consider in the future for doing mobile manipulation. Another interesting presentation was on the Robot Web Tools. While the presentation's balance leaned a bit from technical to fancy (probably a web people thing) it showed some very nice integration possibilities. Depending on how platform agnostic it is it could be re-used for Fawkes. Another thing to look into is tf2. It seems to finally get rolled out in ROS, making it worthwhile to consider it for integration again.

A particular thing that was talked much about was ROS 2.0, the magic next version which solves everything and makes all dreams come true -- sort of. It shows a lot of promise and the open process by which its design decisions should be made is appealing. Some of the things that were discussed indicate that ROS 2.0 might be much easier to integrate with other non-ROS software.

On our end Ingo Lütkebohle (Bielefeld University) and Tim Niemueller(RWTH Aachen University) presented data recording and evaluation techniques. The MongoDB-based logging received quite some attention. It seems to be time to backport the advancements we made on the Fawkes logger version back to ROS. Additionally the RobotMetaLogger was presented that might benefit by supporting the MongoDB-logger as an input source.

On-line Use of Recorded Data from Database

On particular example we presented is the use of data recording to remember point clouds and other data. Certain times of observation points are recorded during a run. Then later the data and associated transforms is restored and the point clouds are merged to fill shadows and occlusions in the data for a complete perception run. Below are some screenshots of the visualization documenting the process. You can find a video of the process in our recent video on deliberative active perception employing hybrid reasoning.

Posted by Tim Niemueller on May 16, 2013 13:36

Fedora now includes Fawkes

Recently we proposed Fawkes for inclusion into Fedora. The review has completed and the package has been accepted! Fawkes and its development environment can now be installed out of the box, see the download page for instructions.

On a related note Fawkes has been chosen by the Fedora Robotics SIG to play a major role in the Fedora Robotics Spin along with Player and Stage. The main idea of this spin is to have software on a LiveDVD providing a ready-to-use robotic simulation environment, with a demo application to introduce users step by step to the available software. Additionally as much robotics related software as possible, ranging from packages for hardware access (laser scanners, robotic arms) and robotic middleware frameworks, to full-blown simulation environments and libraries relevant for robotic applications like vision processing or task control will be added. The Robotics Spin has been proposed as a Fedora 15 Feature.

For this LiveDVD Fawkes will be used in combination with Player and Stage to provide the environment for the demonstration application. In particular, the behavior engine based on Lua will be the tools used to guide the user to complete tasks of increasing complexity within the Stage simulation environment. Among others like Player/Stage and the RoboCup 3D Soccer Server Fawkes will be one of the highlighted robot software packages.

Posted by Tim Niemueller on November 16, 2010 18:09